Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Longest Day Honors Those Affected by Alzheimer's Disease

by Emily Anderson

Being diagnosed with Alzheimer's or having a loved one who is diagnosed is the beginning of a long and winding road. Little by little, memory, cognition, and function drop away. Daily activities like getting washed up and dressed in the morning become a slow, detailed task the requires intense patience and steady guidance. People living with Alzheimer's and their caregivers often share that their nights and days drag, each day feeling so long, yet too short to get everything done.

Today is the official start of summer, and the longest daylight period of the year. In honor of those who are living with Alzheimer's and other dementias, the Alzheimer's Association celebrates today as the "Longest Day."

Here are three ways you can participate to honor the people in your life affected by Alzheimer's Disease:

  1. Share your personal experience or listen to another person's story. Too often, the experiences of dementia are hidden and forgotten, but in fact about a third of older adults have some type of dementia. People are embarrassed to share that their loved one is "losing their mind" or "going senile." This leaves people affected by the disease feeling alone, when in fact millions of people are going through a similar situation. Share your story to help end that stigma, and if you don't have a story to share, make yourself available to listen!
  2. Make time for someone in your life who has Alzheimer's or another dementia. Whether it is a family member, friend, coworker, or neighbor, chances are you know someone who is affected by Alzheimer's or other dementias. Visit or call a loved one living with the disease, bring a meal to a friend who is a caregiver, or take some time to remember people in your life who have died with dementia. 
  3. Do something for your own brain health.  Experts believe that at least half of all dementias are preventable through lifestyle changes. Do something good for your brain today and help end Alzheimer's disease and other dementias--starting with you!

As the sun sets around 9pm tonight, take a moment to consider all the people in your life who have another long day ahead tomorrow, dealing with the effects Alzheimer's and other dementias.


Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Give Feedback to the Department of Aging

by Emily Anderson

The Allegheny Area Agency on Aging (AAA) is taking feedback on their budget for the coming year. Have ideas, programs that you want to see, experiences you want to share? Does your area need an adult day center or better transportation? Let the Area Agency on Aging know!

Take a look at the annual budget plan here. Submit written testimony by emailing Molly Eggleston at molly.eggleston@allghenycounty.us or calling her at 412-350-1323. You can submit written feedback until Friday, June 16th at 4pm. Tell them what you like, what you have struggled with, and what you hope to see in the future!

Some of the programs that the the Department of Aging operates include:


  • Information & Assistance--Connecting people with aging services across the county via the SeniorLine. They aim to be helpful, kind, and knowledgeable about resources that can help in complex life situation.
  • Assessment--Helping people apply for Aging Waiver applications, nursing facility admissions, personal care home supplements, and LIFE Pittsburgh/Community LIFE programs. 
  • OPTIONS Care Management--Coordinating home services like home delivered meals, in-home aides, light housekeeping, and transportation. 
  • Senior Centers--Offering quality fitness, life skills education, health and wellness, arts and humanities, communal meals, and other enriching activities for older adults.
  • Nursing Home Transitions--Assisting nursing home residents back to the community to live independently.
  • Ombudsman--Advocacy assistance with concerns and complaints about senior care facilities or community care.
  • Older Adult Protective Services--Addressing issues of abuse and neglect in facilities and community settings
  • Family Caregiver Support Program--Supporting caregivers through financial assistance and evidence-based training. 


Interested in using one of these programs? Call the SeniorLine at 412-350-5460. Whether or not you have participated in the past, please contact the AAA to share your thoughts and experiences--they can only serve you if they know what you need and want!


Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Check Out the Classes & Events Page!

by Emily Anderson

Have you been enjoying our "Get Smart" series with updates on local classes and events? Good news! We've decided to create a permanent page to help you stay informed on what is happening when around Allegheny County. Instead of once a month updates, now you can simply click the "Classes & Events" tab at the top of the page to see our most current list.

Check it out now by clicking the "Classes & Events" tab above!

Do you know about a class or event that isn't shown on the page? Let us know by emailing Emily at eanderson@familylinks.org!

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Tips for Communicating Through Hearing Loss

by Emily Anderson

Whether your loved one refuses to try a hearing device or the hearing aids only help a little, many caregivers face daily life with hearing impairments. Constantly repeating yourself or feeling like you're shouting at your loved one is frustrating and embarrassing. Instead, try these techniques to improve your loved one's ability to understand you:

Do...

  • Sit or stand directly in front of the person, 3-6 feet away
  • Turn on a light so the person can see and read your face
  • Eliminate background noises, like music or TV
  • Stay at eye level
  • Get the person's attention before speaking
  • Use facial expressions and gestures to enhance your message
  • Speak slowly and distinctly (think about moving your mouth in a more exaggerated way)
  • Use short, simple sentences
  • Raise your voice slightly
  • Rephrase and try different words
  • Use written cues or notes when necessary

Do Not...


  • Speak directly into a person's ear, this causes distortions
  • Talk from a different room
  • Turn your back to the person while talking
  • Chew, eat, or cover your mouth while talking
  • Change the topic suddenly; use cues like a long pause, or phrases like "New subject..."
  • Shout or yell
  • Talk about the person as if they weren't there


For more information on living with hearing loss, try reading this article.



Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Feedback Fix for Hearing Aids

by Emily Anderson

May is Better Hearing Month! We talked to Dr. Suzanne Yoder of the HearWell Center for a series of posts on helping your loved one find solutions to common hearing issues. Today we look at a common problem with hearing aids: that whistling, screeching noise that people find so irritating.

According to Dr. Yoder, feedback (whistling in the hearing aids) is preventable in most hearing aids. There are a few reason for feedback including fit problems, poor device maintenance, poor ear hygiene, inappropriate volume, or misunderstanding of how hearing aids work.

1. Fit
Feedback can occur from an improper fit. Over time, the ears change and cartilage stretches, causing hearing aids to become loose. Some hearing aids can be easily remade to fit better by purchasing a new custom earmold. If the hearing aid is not the type that uses and earmold, the hearing aid would need to be sent to the manufacturer along with an impression of the ear to be rebuilt. This may be covered by a warranty on the device depending on the warranty policy. If the hearing aids are refit, the feedback often goes away.

2. Maintenance
Feedback can also occur if the hearing aid is clogged or if the ear is clogged. Having the hearing aids cleaned and the user’s ears cleaned on a regular schedule can help reduce feedback issues. Most people need to have this type of cleaning every 4-6 months, but some people need more care and may return for cleanings every couple months. To avoid having to make appointments for frequent professional cleanings, caregivers can help by learning how to clean the hearing aids at home. There are different methods depending on the type of hearing aid. Every hearing aid comes with a user manual and a cleaning tool kit. If these are not provided, you can request them. Some hearing aids have small filters that can be removed and replaced at home. This is generally inexpensive and may save extra trips in for cleanings.

3. Inappropriate volume
Feedback can occur from a hearing aid that is incorrectly matched to the patient. As hearing declines, many people try to max-out the volume control on the hearing aids. This can also push the hearing aid to work harder than intended and cause it to become unstable. Hearing aids can be reprogrammed to help meet the greater demands of a progressive loss, but as the hearing aid is pushed to work harder than it was designed, it is more inclined to squeaking and squealing. Sometimes, an in-office modification can help re-balance the hearing aid. At a certain point, though, the hearing aid should be evaluated for appropriateness and may need to be replaced. 

4. Feedback is unavoidable when the ear is covered
A hearing aid is made of a small speaker and small microphones in very close proximity to each other. If you cover the ear, it is normal for the hearing aid to whistle. Advanced hearing aids can help stop the feedback using sound wave cancellation, but a small squeak may still occur when it activates this control. In hearing aids made for severe or profound losses, even the best circuit will still whistle if you cover the hearing aid due to the large amount of power flowing through the device. If there is a situation where covering the ear is unavoidable, there is likely an adapter that can be used to help. For example, phone pads that look like little donuts can be added to the handset of the phone to get it away from the hearing aid but still allow the user to use the phone. There are pillows made like donuts for the same reason, allowing people to rest their head without the irritating noise. Adaptations exist in most circumstances so that hearing aids can stay in the ears where they belong--just ask your provider for suggestions!

Dr. Suzanne Yoder earned her Bachelor’s degree from Thiel College 2000, her Master’s Degree in Audiology from the University of Pittsburgh 2002, and her Doctor of Audiology degree from the University of Pittsburgh 2004. She is board-certified by the American Board of Audiology. She has lived in the Pittsburgh and the surrounding communities her entire life. She is a member of the American Academy of Audiology, the Academy of Doctors of Audiology, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Audiology.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Tools for Better Hearing

by Emily Anderson

May is Better Hearing Month! We talked to Dr. Suzanne Yoder of the HearWell Center for a series of posts on helping your loved one find solutions to common hearing issues. Hearing aids are just one of many ways that people cope with hearing loss. In the technology age, there are catalogs full of other options, and what you choose depends on what your goal is. Dr. Yoder provided the this breakdown of some common assistive devices for hearing loss:

1. Phones and phone adapters
There are nearly a hundred options for phones for the deaf and hard of hearing, ranging from adding an amplifier to a phone to replacing the phone with a device that captions the calls to using video phone technology. Phones can have special volume amplification, slower speed for playback of messages, flashing lights instead of ringers, captioning and more. Some phones are actually free for patients that qualify (application process required). Adapted phones can be used with or without hearing aids. There are also options to connect bluetooth devices, including bluetooth hearing aids, for handsfree listening.

2. Television adapters
First, try turning on captions for your loved one instead of turning up the volume. Physically moving closer to the television can also help with speech clarity, but nothing compares to streaming the sound directly to the ears. Television adapters allow you to send the sound directly to the person with hearing problems. Some look like headphones and some that look like table-side speakers that you can place near your loved one. They can be used with or without hearing aids, but if your loved one already has hearing aids, asking about an adapter that transmits directly to the hearing aids is the best route.

3. Personal sound amplification 
There are many types of devices that can amplify sounds that are not considered hearing aids. Some look like small music player with headphones or bulky necklaces. There are a few that even look like hearing aids and are worn in the ear. Sound amplifiers are limited because they do not allow for the fine-tuning that you get with hearing aids, but they can help in situations where volume is the only problem. Amplifiers are best used in quiet places and when seated close to the sound source, like when you're at home trying to talk over dinner. Amplifiers generally do not work well for severe hearing loss or for people who cannot hear well in noise.

4. FM systems
An FM system is a sophisticated wireless transmission device for the hard of hearing to use in classroom situations or in personal listening situations where a microphone is needed (church, meetings, etc). This type of system requires the use of two devices: a microphone (which is worn by the talker) and a receiver (which is worn by the person with hearing loss). FM systems often connect with hearing aids but can be used independently. They sometimes look like the user is wearing headphones but other models are very small and inconspicuous, especially if they are attached to hearing aids.

5. Smart device apps 
 There are many apps that can be used with a smart device to turn your a phone into a amplifier by directing sound to the ears via headphones. Some apps can also do voice-to-text translation to help people understand messages left on their phone. Also try turning on captioning for media on your phone or tablet.

6. Public accommodations such as captioning
 Many people do not know that if you go to a theater or music hall and tell them you have hearing problems they are required to accommodate your needs. Many venues offer headphones to listen in, but you can also request captioning to read along with the performance. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires accommodations in these public venues as well as many others. Accommodations can also be found in hotels, museums, airports, schools and more. Just ask! Call ahead for details for any theater you plan to visit.

7. Public looping 
Looping is another type of accommodation that can be very easy to use if you already have hearing aids. Hearing aids equipped with a technology called "telecoil" can tune in to public looping without needing any extra equipment. The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra's Heinz Hall, for example, is looped for anyone who wants to tune in. The telecoil is a feature available in most hearing aids, but the feature needs to be activated and the user needs to learn how to turn it on and off.

8. Religious services
Many churches or other congregational settings have special devices for people with hearing loss. Although they are exempt from the ADA regulations, many churches install systems to use with those that need help hearing. Ask a leader in community what accommodations are available for your services.

Dr. Suzanne Yoder earned her Bachelor’s degree from Thiel College 2000, her Master’s Degree in Audiology from the University of Pittsburgh 2002, and her Doctor of Audiology degree from the University of Pittsburgh 2004. She is board-certified by the American Board of Audiology. She has lived in the Pittsburgh and the surrounding communities her entire life. She is a member of the American Academy of Audiology, the Academy of Doctors of Audiology, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Audiology.




Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Find Hearing Help You Can Trust

by Emily Anderson

May is Better Hearing Month! We talked to Dr. Suzanne Yoder of the HearWell Center for a series of posts on helping your loved one find solutions to common hearing issues. This week, we start with Dr. Yoder's tips for finding quality hearing care.

Hearing aids are not heavily regulated. You can purchase them online, through the mail, with a retail office, a health provider’s office or in a medical center. It is sometimes hard to know who to trust but there are some simple ways to research options.

1. Look at the credentials of the provider and choose an audiologist if possible. 
 Audiologists have the most education in the area of communication science and hearing disorders and will be best equipped to address your issue well. Credentialed audiologists could have a variety of letters after their name, including "Au.D," "MA or MS," "Ph.D," or "Ed.D or Sc. D." All of these indicate that the person has extensive training in the practice of audiology. If a provider has other credentials than those listed above, they may not be an audiologist, they may be a hearing instrument specialist or a dispenser. 

2. Look for board certification. 
Audiologists have the option to carry board certification which requires them to participate in more rigorous continuing education classes including ethics coursework. You can look up board certified audiologist by visiting the American Board of Audiology.

3. Ask for a referral or read reviews. 
People who are happy with their hearing aids are a testament to the provider that helped them. If you don’t know anyone that wears hearing aids, researching online reviews may help. Also try asking for a referral from you primary care doctor or a specialist who my have a familiarity with audiology providers.

4. Look up providers in online directories from professional organizations.
Professional organizations help ensure the quality of service by ensuring that their members follow a code of ethics, hold appropriate licenses, and have up-to-date training. Check these professional organizations for a list of audiologists who are current members:
American Academy of Audiology 
Academy of Doctors of Audiology 
Pennsylvania Academy of Audiology

Hearing well is important for people who want to stay socially engaged and enjoy some independence. If you think you or your loved one is experiencing hearing problems, use these tips to contact an audiologist and get a hearing check up!

Dr. Suzanne Yoder earned her Bachelor’s degree from Thiel College 2000, her Master’s Degree in Audiology from the University of Pittsburgh 2002, and her Doctor of Audiology degree from the University of Pittsburgh 2004. She is board-certified by the American Board of Audiology. She has lived in the Pittsburgh and the surrounding communities her entire life. She is a member of the American Academy of Audiology, the Academy of Doctors of Audiology, the Pennsylvania Academy of Audiology.